The Novel Factory Community Forum
Sign up Calendar Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment   Page 1 of 2      1   2   Next
thenovelfactory

Avatar / Picture

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 270
Reply with quote  #1 
A question for people that use the Novel Factory and Scrivener, or indeed, only Scrivener.

I'd be really interested to find out what features or functionality Scrivener has that makes it preferable to transfer over to for whatever parts of novel writing.

Thanks!

__________________
http://www.novel-software.com
“It's extremely useful in organizing and making me think about what I write. The advice was invaluable, and the step-by-step instructions guided me extremely well through the writing process, allowing me to develop characters and plot a lot further than expected.” - See more at: http://www.novel-software.com/writingsoftwaretestimonials.aspx#sthash.0smYiFBM.dpuf
0
Muddypaws113

Junior Member
Registered:
Posts: 4
Reply with quote  #2 
I use both and I really like NF's structure; but Scrivener has a nifty integration with Aeon timeline software, which I find really helpful.
0
mhender668

Avatar / Picture

Junior Member
Registered:
Posts: 7
Reply with quote  #3 
There are a couple of things I like about Scrivener that Novel Factory doesn't have.

1. Typewriter scrolling in full screen.

2. A windows explorer-like list of files and folders that I can color code, but more importantly, I can see the scene and chapter divisions much more easily. Color coding helps me see which character is the POV character, which are ideas, and so forth. 

Within that list I can move scenes around quite easily, and add/subtract chapter or part divisions.

3. I like the format of the 3x5 cards.

4. You can import any file, and tell it to divide scenes at a certain place, i.e., where there's a #.

Those are the main ones, really. I haven't tried compiling anything in Novel Factory, yet.

__________________
Michael E. Henderson
0
thenovelfactory

Avatar / Picture

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 270
Reply with quote  #4 
Thank you for these - that's really useful. Please keep them coming if anyone has any more comments.
__________________
http://www.novel-software.com
“It's extremely useful in organizing and making me think about what I write. The advice was invaluable, and the step-by-step instructions guided me extremely well through the writing process, allowing me to develop characters and plot a lot further than expected.” - See more at: http://www.novel-software.com/writingsoftwaretestimonials.aspx#sthash.0smYiFBM.dpuf
0
Ghostly

Avatar / Picture

Member
Registered:
Posts: 30
Reply with quote  #5 
I'm beta-testing the iOS version of Scrivener at the moment so it is imminent (and it is as smooth as silk). That iPad functionality might make a very persuasive function for using Scrivener in both its iterations (iPad and iPhone as well as the Desktop versions). It is likely that Scrivener v3 (for Mac - and whatever its equivalent will be on Windows) will be released paired with the iOS version. Both versions are in lock-step at the moment.

It is important to note that the iOS version for your iPad etc syncs perfectly to and from Drop Box. It's a brilliant function and it really works like a charm. I have been testing the iOS version on five different iOS devices and it is flawless on all of them. The Desktop version is being updated as the iOS version is developed and they work together like they are supposed to.

I complete some work on the desktop, save it to Drop Box and then pick up the same job on an iOS device and save that to Drop Box (Saving is automatic) then continue on another iOs device altogether (anywhere in the world - using Drop Box), then maybe continue on one of four desktop or Laptop computers - I have never had a sync problem of any kind in the last two iterations of both versions. It is now very solid and utterly professional since the developer, Keith Blount, took over development of the iOS version and both versions are steaming along at a very rapid rate. 

So if you want to use Scrivener on both a desk top and an iPad then get Scrivener and make yourself familiar with it (and Drop Box) - the iOS version is imminent - and it is beautiful.
0
Tian

Junior Member
Registered:
Posts: 1
Reply with quote  #6 
The ability to split the screen in scrivener is a feature I greatly miss in The Novel Factory. I find it makes it easier to describe and visualize scenes and characters as you write because you can have a photo reference right there. Any chance of integrating this?
0
thenovelfactory

Avatar / Picture

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 270
Reply with quote  #7 
Hi Tian,
Thanks for your query.
There are some options for viewing pictures of characters and locations in a side bar at the same time as typing a scene - have you seen that?
Can you give me a bit more info about the Scrivener split screen and how it works / looks?
Perhaps a screenshot or some pointers to where it is that I can investigate myself?
I think it sounds like a very useful feature, so it's definitely something we'd be interested in integrating if we can.

__________________
http://www.novel-software.com
“It's extremely useful in organizing and making me think about what I write. The advice was invaluable, and the step-by-step instructions guided me extremely well through the writing process, allowing me to develop characters and plot a lot further than expected.” - See more at: http://www.novel-software.com/writingsoftwaretestimonials.aspx#sthash.0smYiFBM.dpuf
0
Ghostly

Avatar / Picture

Member
Registered:
Posts: 30
Reply with quote  #8 
1. http://www.literatureandlatte.com/scrivener.php
2. Watch the video tutorials: http://www.literatureandlatte.com/video.php
3. The split screen function is the little page shaped icon at the far right - Go from the left Binder where it shows the manuscript > across to the little Forward /Back icons <> then, then across to the  manuscript title (Delta H in this case) then across to the little up and down indicators then the icon for splitting the screen - it gives you completely different (or the same) set of choices - you could be looking at Chapter 1 in the left hand split and Chapter 15 in the right hand split - or any other combination you can think of. Or have one screen above the other (often used for small laptops).
I have the Split function underneath the Menu Bar trash icon - you can reconfigure (Customise) the Menu Bar any which way you like. These are the functions I use most so I selected them, but there are many other functions you can choose to make Scrivener work exactly the way you want it to for your own needs.

Screen Shot 2016-06-12 at 1.04.53 PM.png 
 

0
thenovelfactory

Avatar / Picture

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 270
Reply with quote  #9 
Ah, I see - thanks! I'll check it out and see what our options are. Also for creating a customised menu bar, though I suspect that might have to wait until the next version.
__________________
http://www.novel-software.com
“It's extremely useful in organizing and making me think about what I write. The advice was invaluable, and the step-by-step instructions guided me extremely well through the writing process, allowing me to develop characters and plot a lot further than expected.” - See more at: http://www.novel-software.com/writingsoftwaretestimonials.aspx#sthash.0smYiFBM.dpuf
0
Wysardry

Avatar / Picture

Junior Member
Registered:
Posts: 24
Reply with quote  #10 
I've only just started using the trial version of The Novel Factory, but it seems a lot more restrictive than Scrivener (which isn't necessarily a bad thing for beginners) and much less suitable for non-fiction books.

If I were to start using The Novel Factory, I'd likely export to Scrivener at some point, as it has the following features:-

1. Export to HTML, Kindle etc.

2. More file types supported in research/notes (PDF, Word, HTML, video, images etc.)

3. A more flexible way of organising sections (they can be any size, mean anything you want and be marked using your own system).
0
thenovelfactory

Avatar / Picture

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 270
Reply with quote  #11 
Thanks for your comments!

Yes, The Novel Factory is definitely more restrictive than Scrivener - the idea was to provide something that walked people through a process, but recently we've been trying to find way to make it less restrictive, while still offering the 'safety' to newer writers who want a bit more hand holding.

And also, yes, the original idea what specifically focussed at novels (and genres novels at that), but we have been asked a few times to make it a bit more suited to non-fiction, and that's something we'd consider, but we're wary of losing our key focus.

A few comments on your comments:

1. We'd never really considered exporting to html as something we'd want - I'll have a think about that. We did recently add the option to export to .epub, which is a Kindle format unless I'm mistaken?

2. Yes, completely agree, The notes section needs lots of improvement. It's high on our priority list.

3. Do you mean what we're currently calling scenes?

Thanks again!

__________________
http://www.novel-software.com
“It's extremely useful in organizing and making me think about what I write. The advice was invaluable, and the step-by-step instructions guided me extremely well through the writing process, allowing me to develop characters and plot a lot further than expected.” - See more at: http://www.novel-software.com/writingsoftwaretestimonials.aspx#sthash.0smYiFBM.dpuf
0
Wysardry

Avatar / Picture

Junior Member
Registered:
Posts: 24
Reply with quote  #12 
The main reasons I would want to use HTML are that it is the easiest format to check for problems, as you can use any HTML (or even text) editor to look at the formatting codes (tags). It's also what most ebook formats are a variation of.

Last time I checked the Kindle publishing guidelines, you could upload files in .epub format and they would be converted to .azw, .azw3 or .kf8, but HTML was the preferred format as the conversion process is simpler. Mobipocket .mobi and Word .doc files can also be used, but the results of the latter can be unpredictable.

I'm not sure what the official term is for the text snippets in Scrivener, but they are represented by an index card and their advantage is that they can contain anything you want, be stored inside or outside of the main document tree and be moved around.

For example, you could split a conversation across several cards and move them around until everything flowed the way you wanted. You could add location descriptions, events, random ideas etc. to different cards in your notes/reference section and then move them to the main document when you had a better idea where they should fit.

I have only tried to write a novel once, a few years ago during NaNoWriMo, but I found that the best way to avoid getting stuck was to write the things I was reasonably sure I wanted to include on separate cards and organise them later. I could also make notes on my mobile phone whilst at work, then add them to Scrivener when I got home.

I only managed 25,0000 words in the 30 days, but it would have been much less if I'd had to do everything in a set order.

I found Scrivener's tree structure to be a good way of organising things, partly because I've used outliner programs such as Treepad (http://treepad.com/) and Maple (http://www.crystaloffice.com/maple/) in the past. If you could find a way to merge your roadmap feature into a tree-based outliner system, that would definitely make the whole process simpler and more flexible.

I'm not sure how many others would like that change though.
0
thenovelfactory

Avatar / Picture

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 270
Reply with quote  #13 
Thanks for the feedback!

There's plenty of things for us to think about here.

I think exporting to html should be something we could do in the fairly near future, so I'll add it to the To Do list.

Adding a more flexible 'index card' type feature is definitely something we'd love to do, but I think we need to put a bit more thought into it and will be a bit more restricted by our platform. It's definitely in the pipeline, but timings are uncertain.

I'll have a think about the tree structure thing. Personally, I didn't find it 100% intuitive when I first saw it, which was why I was reluctant to do something similar, but if the benefits outweigh the (probably not that big) learning curve - or perhaps if we can offer it as a customisation option for those who want it, that might be a way forward. I'll chew it over.

__________________
http://www.novel-software.com
“It's extremely useful in organizing and making me think about what I write. The advice was invaluable, and the step-by-step instructions guided me extremely well through the writing process, allowing me to develop characters and plot a lot further than expected.” - See more at: http://www.novel-software.com/writingsoftwaretestimonials.aspx#sthash.0smYiFBM.dpuf
0
Ghostly

Avatar / Picture

Member
Registered:
Posts: 30
Reply with quote  #14 
A goldmine of templates

scrivener five part structure template

********

And these from the very smart and lovely Belinda Crawford:

Templates (and template sheets) for Scrivener

Spreadsheets for story structure

World-building and other templates

Templates by others

These are some great writing templates by other people. Be sure to check them out!

0
KellBrigan

Avatar / Picture

Member
Registered:
Posts: 94
Reply with quote  #15 
Re. Overall features. A couple reasons I went with the Novel Factory rather than Scrivener are the lower learning curve and overall less cluttered feel. (Also, I had been using yWriter previously and continue to use TreePad, and NF provided features I was missing in yWriter.)

About TreePad -- it's a freebie outlining program. Nice & simple and very useful.

So far, I'm using TreePad for noting overall ideas for the anthology I'm working on and individual NF files for each short story. I'm adding character and location notes after writing the rough draft, not before. (For the rough draft, which I'm writing longhand, I have a single page of very loose notes.) The NF features I'll be using, in this instance, more for editing than pre-writing planning. Not sure what I'll do if/when I work on a novel again. I'm more a plotter than a pantser, but I seem to get gummed up by too much planning. The NF features are great on rewrites, though, especially for keeping characters, character back stories, locations and timelines consistent.
0
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.